#EmmyNoms: Just How Many Characters Does @TatianaMaslany Have to Play to Get an #EmmyNod? #CloneClub

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I’m going to be living up to part of my blog name this morning and going on a little rant. After all, this IS RantsReviewsandReels. The 2014 Emmy nominations were announced this morning, and it begs the question that rabid fans of the show Orphan Black have been shouting from their rooftops: HOW?! How was Tatiana Maslany, who just WON the Critic’s Choice Award for best  actress, NOT nominated for an Emmy?! How? More importantly, why? Who was it on the Best Actress in a Drama list to bump her off? Fans of the show who have been devoted watchers from the start, or even more recent converts were SHOCKED this morning. Even Entertainment Weekly said it best: How many different characters does Tatiana Maslany have to play to score an Emmy nomination? Seriously now, how many characters does it take? She’s already been playing 5 regular clone characters since season 1, and they added more for season 2. To top it all off, ALL of them have different personalities, looks, and one of them is even a female to male transgender character all of whom are played by ONE actress. I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, Tatiana Maslany’s performance on Orphan Black is some of the best acting I have ever seen. Ever. And if you thought her playing different characters was a trip, try playing a character who is pretending to be someone else who is pretending to be someone else. Then, there’s the technical aspect of acting with acting doubles, tennis balls, and then nothing–literally nothing, and giving a full-out believable performance. Season 2 was quite a ride, and I can only guess which episode the Orphan Black team submitted for Emmy consideration, as it only got more complex. But seriously, given the other actresses on that list, no one can hold a candle to the work that Maslany does. She would need her own category, and about seven different Emmys to take home.

Spotlight on Gary Oldman as Drexl in #TrueRomance

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With less than six minutes of screen time in Tony Scott’s True Romance (1993), Gary Oldman proves that there truly are no small parts in the acting world. Playing the pimp of the main character, Alabama (Patricia Arquette,) Oldman steals the show. In his performance, he also proves that vocally, there is no place that the human voice cannot go. He is unrecognizable and completely compelling. His monologue, penned by Quentin Tarantino, is one of the best in cinematic history. I am surprised was not nominated for an Oscar for this portrayal. Heck, I’m surprised he doesn’t have a dozen Oscars. He’s amazing. But, like many great character actors, they often are overlooked for the “stars” of projects. But, you can’t silence Gary Oldman. The minute he comes onscreen, whatever he’s in, it’s his scene. He truly owns whatever scene he is in, no matter how large or small.  Take a look at his pivotal scene. From character actor, to leading man, Gary Oldman is truly awesome.

Taking Advantage of a “Career Lull”: Using My Words

What do I have in common with Steve Martin, Tina Fey, James Franco, and Andrew McCarthy? We’re actors who are also writers. You read that correctly, Andrew McCarthy is, in fact, a writer. He’s an award-winning travel writer. Check out some of his stuff on National Geographic Traveler. Now, I’m not talking about actors who all of the sudden want to “write” their memoirs, and get a ghost writer to do it for them. I’m talking about people with actual skills, who do their own writing. As a matter of fact, Tina Fey and Steve Martin actually STARTED OUT as WRITERS. I’m guessing they did it while they were pursuing acting as well, due to the fact that they are in both realms of the industry. Granted, there are those actors who have also written screenplays or stage plays, and blogs,  but that’s a different type of article all together.

I started acting when I was around the age of 8, maybe 9.  But I started making up stories as soon as I could talk. I even had an imaginary friend when I was 5 who I would tell my stories to. Her name was Jinglelyn, and again, I was 5. When I actually learned to read and write, writing took a back seat to performing onstage. I had found my passion for storytelling on stage. And I loved it. It’s my first love. Telling stories, no matter what shape or form, is what I love.

What I find funny now, is the fact that my parents kept giving me journals on my birthdays or Christmas, and I never really used them. I wasn’t really a “dear diary” type of girl anyways. It seemed sort of silly to recount my day on paper. I started writing short stories and plays, and when I got to high school, I helped start up the creative writing club at my all-girls, Catholic high school. I wrote stories, parts of novels I was working on, and seriously wanted to become a writer and an actor when I grew up. I was involved in anything creative. I sang in choirs, acted in the school plays and wrote stories. My English teacher even gave me a writing award my junior year of high school.  When I got to college, I majored in English because I love the element of story-telling, plot and characters. I thought it would help in the acting realm because I was able to learn about the different things that make up a good story. It was sort of like four years of script-analysis. I acted throughout college, even directed. My senior year of college, I got my first headshots and auditioned at my first major theater convention, which led to moving to NYC to study at Circle in the Square Theater School.

Within these past six years, I have been acting and putting writing on the back burner. I got my union cards and even pursued stand-up.  The closest I came to writing, before starting this blog, was stand-up comedy, which I still love because you can create your own material.  I started this blog because I wanted to get back into writing, and I wanted to write something from the perspective of an actor who was going through the ups and downs in their career. Not someone who is washed-up and giving advice. I’m still in the trenches and being in a  career “lull,” I have been writing about what I love. Movies I love, movies I loathe, anything and everything that has to do with the industry, with a unique perspective. It seems like I’m in good company of those who came before me. If you use all of your talents, it can lead to something. What that is, I don’t know. But I am pursuing my writing and my acting. So I guess I can add a back-slash to my job description. I’m a writer/actor. And I’m so glad you are reading my blog. Thanks.