The Many Sides of Amy Dunne: Rosamund Pike in #GoneGirl

gonegirl
Rosamund Pike as Amy Dunne in 2014’s “Gone Girl” directed by David Fincher.

When you’re the daughter of two opera singers, and spent your childhood observing your parents onstage in classic melodramatic fair, it’s safe to assume that you know how drama and suspense work. Actress Rosamund Pike is the aforementioned daughter of two opera singers, and it seems as if her flair for the dramatic has helped her with her latest project, Gone Girl. Adapted from Gillian Flynn’s  best-selling 2012 novel of the same name, the movie is just as suspenseful as the book. Not only that, but Pike’s performance as the complex Amy Dunne is astonishing to watch. Nominated this year for both a Golden Globe and a Screen Actors Guild Award for her role, Rosamund Pike gives a performance few actors would be able to achieve. Amy’s nuances and complexities are accompanied by the fact that viewers never really know which aspects of her personality are truthful. British-born Pike, plays New York native, and Missouri transplant Amy Dunne to a tee. Without giving away major plot points, I will say, that she plays all the layers so perfectly that for the time being, it’s hard for me to not vote for her for the SAG Awards. She legitimately plays an honest-to-goodness sociopath, and it’s fascinating to watch her transformation. Director David Fincher has always been one of my favorites, and he doesn’t disappoint. However, with both Flynn’s novel and her screenplay (which she adapted herself), I will ask her this: What’s up with that ending? 

Want to know more? Gone Girl is currently available On Demand, Amazon Prime, and also stars Ben Affleck and Neil Patrick Harris. Gillian Flynn’s novel is available both online, and at your local bookstore.

Someone Build a #TimeMachine and Give #LaurenGraham All of the Awards for #GilmoreGirls. #Seriously

2002 was the only year that Lauren Graham was nominated for a Golden Globe. That is a travesty to the acting profession. To this day, her work on both Gilmore Girls and NBC’s Parenthood (which is in its final season,) has pretty much been overlooked by critics. However, audience members, myself included, have certainly known of her massive talent for years. Graduating from Barnard College (Columbia University) with a B.A. in English, and her MFA in Acting from Southern Methodist University, she certainly had the training under her belt, and a wealth of experience long before Gilmore Girls hit the airwaves. However, when GG was finally brought to life, there was no better person to handle the fast-paced, complex, and witty dialogue of writer/creator Amy Sherman-Palladino than Lauren Graham.

Breathing life into Lorelai Gilmore, Graham demonstrated her extensive emotional range and comedic skills during its seven year run. Even seven years later, her acting on Gilmore Girls is still some of the best acting I’ve seen on television. She should have won an Emmy, she should have won a Golden Globe. Maybe, we can retroactively give her all the awards from the 2000s. If you haven’t seen Gilmore Girls before, sign on to Netflix and binge-watch the entire series. Do it now! You won’t regret it.

#Laughter is the Best #Medicine: Binge-Worthy TV Shows For When You’re Sick

My current state is that of a cesspool of germs. To cope these past 3 days, I’ve resorted to Netflix overdosing, in addition to tea, and over the counter medicines.

Deadly Women (TV Show airs on Investigation Discovery channel and is streaming on Netflix)

It’s cheesy, I know. But, it’s addictive. Watch it just for the re-enactments alone. There are also soundbite gems from former FBI profiler, Cadace DeLong. Apparently every case is the weirdest one she’s “ever studied.”

Breaking Bad (Airs on AMC, currently streaming on Netflix. Just ended. Sad.) Seriously, if you haven’t seen this show, it’s not too late to get sucked in. It’s insane and totally worth the binge-watching if you’re sick. It’s just as addictive as that blue meth they peddle on the show. Get watching!

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Wonder Years (Aired on ABC from 1988-1993; Available streaming on Netflix) If you ever wish that you could have your Mom tuck you in and feed you chicken soup again and curse being an adult, the Wonder Years is for you. Kevin Arnold can help you get through anything…from your first crush, to your cold.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30 Rock (aired on NBC, currently streaming on Netflix) Have no fear, whatever state you’re currently in with your illness, chances are, Liz Lemon has had a day that is far worse than yours. Revel in the fact that this show is so funny that you’ll laugh the whole time and get better quickly.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The West Wing (aired on NBC, currently streaming on Netflix) Until our real government re-opens, why not watch one that is actually functioning. The West Wing is perfect for that and with writing like Aaron Sorkin’s, you’ll never get bored.

 

 

 

 

 

The Riches (aired on FX for two seasons, currently streaming on Netflix) This only lasted two seasons, but if you are a mega-fan of Breaking Bad and are going into Walter White withdrawal, check out The Riches with Eddie Izzard as the bad guy and he’s hysterical at it. “A family of crooks assume the identity of an upper-middle-class suburban clan in the Deep South.”–IMDB

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Raising Hope (currently airing on Tuesdays at 8p.m. on Fox, the first three seasons are streaming on Netflix): Theater and film vets Martha Plimpton and Cloris Leachman co-star in this hysterical series about a 20-something guy who is left to raise his daughter. Oh yeah, Martha Plimpton (you know, from the Goonies) plays the grandmother.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Psych (airs on the USA Network, streaming on Netflix): If you’re a fan of Law & Order, but wish it were, you know, funny, this is the show for you. Plus, it’s a fake detective agency and they are more often than not better than the detectives.  Oh, and four words: Clue. Movie. Tribute. Episode.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Office (aired on NBC, streaming on Netflix) Hey, when you’re out sick, at least you’re not at work. Why not take some time to vicariously laugh and prank co-workers by watching episodes of the Office? 

Malcolm in the Middle (aired on Fox, streaming on Netflix): For the lighter side of Bryan Cranston before he broke bad, pre-Heisenberg, from 2000-2006, he was just a laughable, fun-loving dad named Hal. Not to mention, Cranston got Emmy and Golden Globe nominations from this series as well.